This is default featured slide 1 title
This is default featured slide 2 title
This is default featured slide 3 title
 

Miniature Paintings

What is a miniature painting?

The word “miniature” is derived from the word ‘minimum’ which does not really relate to just the size of the image but uses a red lead paint (which has a pigment or a glue solution) to bring out the different colors and illuminate the image or manuscript. The details in the miniature paintings differentiate them from small paintings. With the help of a magnifying glass, you will be able to see the fine brush strokes used to perform this art. The miniature painting attracts viewers to see the minute details designed.

There are various painting techniques which are visible under a magnifying glass such as:

  • Pointillism
  • Stippling
  • Hatching, Cross Hatching, Contour Hatching
  • Scumbling
  • Smooth Shading
  • Three-dimensional

Though the Miniature Paintings contain every element of a larger picture like color composition, image clarity and other special effects, what sets them apart are the fine brush strokes and the tiniest design details.

This form of art requires a high degree of expertise and takes years to practice and perfect it. While working on miniature art, the artist must have absolute physical control on all his movements. This is very important because any shaky movement can divert the brush stroke leading to spoil the image. It is very important to have a good and tidy working space while doing miniature painting. Color consistency, precision and picture depth need to be in control.

In ancient India, there were various schools which taught the art of miniature painting illustrating different religions such as Buddhism and Jainism.

Hindu God “Budha” is a good example or an elaboration of paintings in today’s world. Budha Paintings are the symbolic representation for Buddhism. It is a devotional icon for Buddhist monks and for followers of Buddhism. The extant The extant Miniature Paintings are good examples of Budha Paintings. These belonged to the Bengal paintings and were painted on palm leaves depicting the manuscript of the Buddhist text. are good examples of Budha Paintings. These belonged to the Bengal paintings and were painted on palm leaves depicting the manuscript of the Buddhist text.

“Tibetan thangka” is a complicated and a three dimensional form of miniature Tibetan Budha Paintings on a cotton or silk cloth depicting the Buddhist God. It also depicts the life of Budha in a pictorial manner and is considered as an important learning tool.

Since these paintings depict a religion, all symbols and designs should be painted according to the rules based on the Buddhist scared scriptures. This requires the miniaturist to be trained and have a good knowledge of the religion.

Not only Budha painting but on an overall level, miniature painting is an art that is very rich in history continued all across the world.